Trees of Markland Lodge, Huyton


Markland Lodge    


Over the years, a number of rare (and not so rare) trees have been planted in the garden of Markland Lodge - along with the common and mature ones that were already there.  Some of the new plantings have survived, and are quite rare - some even very rare for the region.   Some are quite small, having been planted from seed.  The following list shows the plantings and the origin of some specimens.
 
 
Name of tree in England


Botanical name


Comment

1 Snakebark maple Acer Hersii Named on account of their striped bark, this is just one of the 'snakebark' maples. I think it is Acer Hersii, but I can't be sure as it was given to me by a friend. It has grown quite quickly. It is known for its vase-shaped crown of arching branches in its early years. Planted ~1990
2 Loquat Eriobotrya Japonica Friends in Boston sent me seeds of this tree which they collected from Bermuda.  It is quite a tender evergreen tree, and may not not last through a harsh winter here in the UK.  It is common in some of the southern states of the USA. Planted ~1995
3 Pride of India Koelreuteria Paniculata This tree grew from seed which was collected from beneath a tree in the Botanical gardens at Oxford.  Despite its name, it is a Chinese tree.  When adult, it produces yellow flowers in August, which later turn into seeds in papery bladders (a bit like Chinese lanterns). Planted ~1987
4 Common Pear Tree Pyrus Communis This tree is quite old, and showing signs of decay.  The garden originally had three of these massive old Victorian pear trees.  Two have died, and this one is on its last legs.
5 Incense Cedar Calocedrus [Libocedrus] Decurrens This tree is similar to a Thuja, and comes from the Pacific shores and islands.  The crushed foliage is said to smell of turpentine. Planted ~1994
6 Silk Tree or Persian Acacia Albitzia Julibrissin The seeds for this tree were brought back from the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, having been collected from underneath the large tree on the path winding up the knoll.  Being rather tender, it may not last through a harsh winter in the UK.  The leaves (up to 20 in long) open rather late and are quite feathery with numerous small leaflets, and remind people of a touch-sensitive plant; they 'close up' at night.  The pink flowers open in late summer and are borne in dense fluffy clusters - almost like a powder puff. Planted ~1995
7 Amur Lime Tilia Amurensis The seeds for this tree were sent to me from the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, having been collected from underneath the amur lime there - by one of the gardeners (Jack Green).  However, I am not convinced that this is actually an amur lime - it seems more like a common lime to me.  The amur lime is very rare in England but is said to have one of the strongest scents of all the lime trees. I await the first flowers. Planted ~1993
8 Hybrid Strawberry Tree Arbutus x Andrachnoides This is a cross between the strawberry tree native to Ireland (Arbutus Unedo) and the Greek strawberry tree (Arbutus Andrachne) - in each case, the fruits only resemble strawberries. Planted ~1993
9 Golden Cappadocian Maple Acer Cappadocium 'Aureum' Native to Asia Minor and ranging through the Caucasus and the Himalayan mountains into China, this tree is becoming more common in England as one of the two cultivars 'aureum' and 'rubrum'.  The version here ('aureum') has yellowish leaves tinged with red. Planted ~1987
10 Tee tree Stewartia pseudocamellia Planted in 2005
11 Tibetan Cherry Prunus Serrula A native of West and South West China, this tree has become more popular in Britain not for its (inconspicuous) flowers or (poor) autumn colouring but, rather, for its shiny 'mahogany' bark.  It is sometimes said that wise gardeners plant it near a path so that passes by can rub (but not strip) the smooth bark and thereby keep it smooth. Planted ~1992
12 Korean Maple Acer Pseudosieboldianum This is quite a rarity.  The seeds for this tree were sent from the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, having been collected from underneath the tree there (again by Jack green).  It is supposed to have excellent and early autumn colours - but this particular plant has not shown them yet.  The leaves are tending to 'brown' at the edges each year. Planted ~1994
13 Spur-Leaf Tetracentron Sinense This is very rare in the UK.  The spring leaf colouring and texture is exceptional, though the leaves tend to deteriorate before the summer - with brown broken edges.  A peculiar feature of this tree is the slender spurs along the shoots, each capped by the base of the stalk of a single leaf.  There is a good example of this tree in the Edinburgh Botanical Gardens. Planted ~1990
14 Jacquemont's Birch Betula Jacquemontii This tree is native to Kashmir, and has become popular in England of late because of its smooth clear white bark, with very few dark patches which mar the bark of the common birch (Betula Pendula).  Though this particular tree was purchased from a reputable supplier (Hilliers, UK), it did not seem at first to be a Jacquemontii - the bark was not particularly clear.  It is, however, imrpoving with age.Planted ~1990
15 Amur Maple Acer Ginnala Grown from seed that was given to me by a friend who got it from Canada, this tree is native to China, Manchuria and Japan.  The leaves open early and are a distinct yellow at first. In autumn, the colours are quite a bright red, though the leaves fall early.Planted ~1986
16 Smooth Japanese Maple Acer Palmatum 'Ozakazuki' Acer Palmatum is quite a common garden tree, and the form 'Ozakazuki' is quite popular.  Justifiably so, as it has fresh green leaves in summer with scarlet seeds hanging beneath in bunches.  Autumn colours are good. Planted ~1990
17 Colorado Blue Spruce Picea Pungens 'Hoopesii' Again, a fairly common small garden tree, 'Hoopesii' is a strikingly ice-blue-white, probably semi-dwarf, form of the Colorado Blue Spruce. Planted ~1986
18 Snowy Mespil Amelanchier Lamarkii [Canadensis] [Laevis] Now naturalised in Britain, this tree came originally from NE USA in 1870 and is now very common.  The white flowers appear early in spring, and the leaf colour, good all summer long, turns a bright red in the autumn.Planted ~1985
19 Japanese Red Cedar Cryptomeria Japonica This is another redwood.  The first seed came to England from China in 1842, and others came from Japan in 1861, the two types are subtley different.  I think this is the Japanese version. Planted ~1994
20 Sycamore Acer Pseudoplatanus The 'weed tree' of Great Britain - the common sycamore - though it is not called this in the USA or Scotland (where I think it is called the 'Plane' tree).  This tree is very old and established.
21 Pond Cypress Taxodium ascendens 'nutans' Rather small - planted in 2004.
22 Wellingtonia or Giant Sequoia Sequoiadendron Giganteum Discovered in 1852 during the Californian gold rush, this tree is only to be found naturally in a few parts of California.  One of the trees there is the biggest tree in the world (not the tallest - but the largest). 'General Sherman', as it is known, is 87m high and 24m round.  All the English country houses of the nineteenth century just had to have one of these and, within 90 years of the seeds coming to England, this was the biggest tree in every county. Second planting in 2003.
23 Korean Thuja Thuja Koreana Quite a rare tree, this is said to have foliage which, when crushed, has a scent 'like a rich fruit cake with plenty of almonds and a trace of lemon'. Planted ~1990
24 Japanese Umbrella Pine Sciadopytis Verticilata Not a pine at all, this tree is another redwood.  The English name comes from the whorled leaves - like the spokes of an umbrella. Planted in 2004.
25 Lacebark Pine Pinus Bungeana Another rarity - though it might look quite ordinary.  This is a very slow growing tree the first of which came to England from China in 1846.  When mature, the bark shows an attractive pink/blue/grey marbled effect. Planted ~1990
26 Common Hawthorn Crataegus Monogyna This is the common (white flowered) hawthorn. which forms hedges and trees across Britain.  This tree is old and established.
27 Blue Noble Fir Abies Procera 'Glauca' From western Canada, the blue/green version of this has been commonly planted since 1850, particularly in Scotland.  This 'bluer' cultivar is less common. Planted ~1984
28 Wellingtonia or Giant Sequoia Sequoiadendron Giganteum Discovered in 1852 during the Californian gold rush, this tree is only to be found naturally in a few parts of California.  One of the trees there is the biggest tree in the world (not the tallest - but the largest). 'General Sherman', as it is known, is 87m high and 24m round.  All the English country houses of the nineteenth century just had to have one of these and, within 90 years of the seeds coming to England, this was the biggest tree in every county. The first of these that I planted lived about 15 years, but then went brown and died in 2003. I have since re-planted a small one.
29 Dove Tree or Handkerchief Tree Davidia Involucrata 'Vilmoriana' This was first discovered by Abbe David (a French priest) in China - hence the Latin name.  The flowers are insignificant but are surrounded by two large white bracts - which look like pieces of cloth on the tree (hence the common name). Planted ~1984
30 Eucryphia 'rostrevor' Eucryphia Nymans 'A' rostrevor Planted in 2005
31 Chinese Tulip tree Liriodendron Chinense Nicer leaves than the American version. Small planting in 2005.
32 Japanese Cherry Prunus 'Kanzan' This is an old, common, Japanese cherry.  On younger trees, the branches curve upwards but, with age, and with the weight of heavy blossoms, the branches tend to fall, as in this case.  This tree is old and established.
33 Maidenhair Tree Gingko Biloba Quite uncommon in the north west of England, this native of China is certainly something of an oddity in botanical terms (being a conifer with broad leaves).  The oldest tree of this type in England was planted at Kew in 1761 - and is still in good health. Planted ~1978
34 Bamboo-Leaved Oak Quercus Myrsinifolia This is a very unusual tree.  There are a number of evergreen oaks, one of which is not uncommon in England (the Holm Oak), but the one here is reputedly the most elegant and rare of the evergreen oaks.  It was first introduced to England in 1864.  The new leaves open with a tinge of red, and the acorns have a distinctive 'ringed' cup. Still waiting the first ones (2005). Planted ~1990
35 Nyssa Nyssa Not sure what type of Nyssa this is. Planted ~1990
36 Oxydendron Oxydendron virginiana Not sure about this. Planted ~1990



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